Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Dubai World Seeks Debt Delay, Owes $59 Billion; Default Swaps Soar .... SCHADENFREUDE....

I have to repeat myself More Bad News For Dubai ...... I think after you have finished reading the follwing post & watching the clips it should be clear that the $ 60 - $ 80 billion from Dubai itself is only a fraction of all the bad loans sitting mainly on the regional bank balance sheets ( probably no coincidence that the supervisor aka regional lender of last resort gave some "prudent" accounting advice back in January > How Not To Restore Confidence....."United Arab Emirates Edition" ) .......

Muß mich da wohl erneut wiederholen More Bad News For Dubai ...... Ich denke das jeder der das folgende Posting gelesen und sich die Videos angeshen hat mit mir übereinstimmt das die jetzt im Raum stehenden bis zu 80 Mrd $ die Dubai selbst im Feuer stehen hat nur einen kleinen Teils der Summen ausmachen die ansonsten noch in den wohl überwiegend regionalen Bankenbilanzen ( obwohl man ja unsere Landesbanken nie unterschätzen sollte...;-) schlummern ( sicher kein Zufall das die Aufsicht bereits im Januar dazu aufgerufen hat sich bei der Bilanzierung "verantwortungsvoll" zu verhalten... > How Not To Restore Confidence....."United Arab Emirates Edition" ).....



Dubai World Seeks Debt Delay as Abu Dhabi Provides $5 Billion

Nov. 25 (Bloomberg) -- Dubai World, the government-owned holding company struggling with $59 billion of liabilities, is seeking to delay repayment on all of its debt, even after Abu Dhabi banks provided $5 billion for Dubai’s support fund.

Dubai World will ask all creditors for a “standstill agreement” as it negotiates to extend the maturities of its debt, including $3.52 billion of Islamic bonds due for repayment on Dec. 14 by its property unit Nakheel PJSC, the builder of Dubai’s palm tree-shaped islands, the company said in an e- mailed statement today.

The emirate, home to the world’s tallest tower and the biggest man-made islands, owes $4.3 billion next month and another $4.9 billion in the first quarter of 2010 through government and corporate debt, Deutsche Bank AG data show. Abu Dhabi government-controlled banks, National Bank of Abu Dhabi PJSC and Islamic lender Al Hilal Bank, bought all $5 billion of bonds from the government, Dubai’s Department of Finance said in an e-mailed statement today.

To understand how hyperinflated things are you should take a look at The Upcoming Skyscraper Tsunami & watch at least one of the YOUTUBE clips at the end of the post..........

Um zu verstehen wie größenwahnsinnig die Lage in Dubai ist empfehle ich dringend einen Blick auf The Upcoming Skyscraper Tsunami & zumindest auf einen der YOUTUBE Clips am Ende des Postings zu werfen.....

Dubai, the second biggest of seven sheikhdoms that make up the United Arab Emirates, set up a $20 billion Dubai Financial Support Fund after the credit crisis triggered the world’s worst property crash and hurt its finance and tourism industries. The emirate raised $10 billion by selling bonds to the U.A.E. central bank in February, with some of the money going to property developers.

What a difference a year makes ( see No Kidding.... Dubai May Need Help To Repay Debt....

Welch Unterschied doch ein Jahr ausmachen kann ( siehe No Kidding.... Dubai May Need Help To Repay Debt....

‘Shut Up’

Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al-Maktoum said Nov. 9 the emirate’s bond program to raise a further $10 billion will be “well received,” and those who doubt the unity of Dubai and Abu Dhabi should “shut up.” Abu Dhabi, the U.A.E.’s capital, is owner of the world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund and holds almost all of its oil.

Home prices in Dubai plummeted 47 percent in the second quarter from a year ago, the steepest drop of any market, according to Knight Frank LLC. Property prices may drop further, a survey by Colliers International showed Oct. 14.

Let´s hope the following handsome "gesture" will be enough to please the new overlord.....;-)

Bleibt zu hoffen das die nachfolgende Geste genug sein wird um die neuen Herren im Hause zu weiteren Mrd. zu bewegen.... ;-)

Dubai Autonomy Fades as Crisis Strengthens Abu Dhabi

Nov. 24 (Bloomberg) -- Until last month, a billboard at one of Dubai’s busiest roundabouts featured one photo, of Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum. The new billboard says “Long live our Emirates union” and also shows United Arab Emirates President Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan.
“For the general purposes of the Dubai Financial Support Fund…” FT Alphaville

As FT Alphaville noted the market was on Wednesday digesting news that the $5bn Dubai had raised from two Abu Dhabi government-controlled banks would not go to paying off Nakheel convert bond holders as expected. Instead the proceeds would go towards the general purposes of the Dubai Financial Support Fund (DFSF).

The likes of Barclays Capital, meanwhile, estimate the liabilities could be as much as $72bn, a figure that runs significantly beyond Dubai’s own ability to refinance without support from Abu Dhabi.

Non-bank external debt maturing over the next two years are sizable - Barclays Capital

In other words, there’s no telling how big the total hole Dubai has to plug is, much less its strategy for doing so, and more importantly how Dubai World bond holders — the government-owned group which owns Nakheel — rank in the fund’s priorities.

On the latter, the indication from today’s news is that they don’t rank highly at all.
CDS report: All eyes on Dubai World FT Alphaville

The Dubai Government announced that it is restructuring Dubai World, an Investment company owned by the government, with immediate effect. It has asked creditors for a six-month standstill on its obligations until at least 30 May 2010.

Spreads throughout the region widened on the shock news. More
volatility can be expected as investors await details of the restructuring

Markit chart of UAE CDS

LEX / FT

Dubai’s hopes of becoming a world financial centre are proving to be nothing more than an Ozymandian dream. Wednesday’s unexpected decision by Dubai World, the Gulf emirate’s largest state-owned conglomerate, to impose a six-month debt standstill has foreign creditors up in arms. Earlier this month, Dubai’s ruler Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum publicly pledged his support for the group and its obligations. Investors, perhaps foolishly, took him at his word.

The consequences of the standstill, and possible eventual default, are far-ranging. The repayment of Dubai World’s $4bn Nakheel bond was seen as a litmus test for the emirate’s ability to deal with the $80bn owed by the sovereign and its state-controlled companies. The emirate’s willingness to do this is now in doubt, especially as only an hour earlier it raised $5bn from two state-controlled banks in Abu Dhabi. This was only half what had been expected, but followed $10bn of earlier support from the kingdom’s richer neighbour.

Foreign creditors are muttering darkly about taking legal action.
You really cannot make this up..... No Bailout, lets sue them.....

Den Satz muß man sich mehrmals durchlesen... Erst dann wird deutlich in welcher Welt die Bankster in erster Linie wegen der andauernden Hilfe durch den Steuerzahler noch immer leben.....

Dubai shock after debt standstill call FT

Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service immediately downgraded the ratings of all six government-related issuers in Dubai following news of the repayment delay and left them on review for possible further downgrade.Moody’s cut ratings on some government-related entities to junk status, while S&P cut ratings on some entities to one level above junk.

UBS: support for Dubai may be less than assumed MW

Analysts at UBS said authorities will not have taken the decision to restructure Dubai World lightly and that there are three potential explanations for the decision. Firstly, UBS said, Abu Dhabi's support for Dubai might be less generous than assumed. "Perhaps Abu Dhabi has forced Dubai to tackle the problem of excessive corporate debt 'in-house' first before extending more financial support," the broker said.

A second possibility is that corporate-sector problems might be more severe than assumed, UBS said.

Thirdly, Dubai's debt might be higher than the generally assumed $80 billion to $90 billion due to potential off-balance sheet liabilities, it added

Just in time.....

NYT

CSI Dubai FT Alphaville



Some Dubai World Unit Creditors Form Group WSJ

Among options bondholders are exploring is the possibility of seizing Dubai land that is being used to secure the bonds. But Julian Lim, a London-based bond analyst at Nomura, says there are question marks over the value of the land backing the bonds. In addition, it is unclear whether bondholders would even be able to seize the property given that local courts may consider those assets sovereign entities of Dubai, he added.
Detailed Debt & Maturity Profile Dubai, Abu Dhabi & UAE ZH

A Financial Mirage in the Desert NYT

Quantifying External UAE And Dubai Loss Exposure ZH

"Kreditgetriebene Fata Morgana" Querschüsse

Dubai's dramatic boom over the last decade in pictures Telegraph

FACTBOX - What assets Dubai could be forced to sell Reuters

Total Eclipse At The Heart Of Dubai’s World Edward Hugh

The question is, of course, now that the emirate’s lop sided growth model has been shown to be completely dysfunctional, what are the viable long term business prospects in a city with so much excess capacity as far as property goes. According to the Dubai Statistics Center, the total population was 1,422,000 as of 2006, of which 1,073,000 were male and only 349,000 were females.

Evidently activity associated with the construction industry can offer some part of the explanation for this massive gender imbalance. Just under 20% of the population are estimated to be UAE nationals. Approximately 85% of the expatriate population (and 71% of the emirate’s total population) is thought to be Asian, chiefly Indian (51%), Pakistani (15%), Bangladeshi (10%). This impression of a large construction industry oriented population is reinforced by the economic data

Real estate and construction account for about 23% of GDP and financial services for another 11%.

[DUBAI_chart1]

Dubai Cartoon Telegraph :-)

Dubai Bubble Burst Youtube

Die Finanzkrise erreicht Dubai Youtube ( German/Deutsch)

Geschichte von Dubai / UAE ARTE via Youtube

Dubai Real Estate CrashYoutube

DUBAI = LAS VEGAS/SILICON VALLEY ON STEROIDS!

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9 Comments:

Blogger jmf said...

CBOE Volatility Index drops to its lowest level since Aug. 2008, hits 20.05

7:26 AM  
Blogger francois-guillaume said...

really ??? lowest VOL with all whats goin on ??? isnt this nuts ???

5:38 AM  
Blogger jmf said...

moin,

that´s what is happening when ROBOTRADING is dominating the market....

They only know one paramater... Weaker $ highet stocks...

Will be fun to wathc the US opening tomorrow... Mybe for the first time in at least a few weeks humans will overturn the robos... ;-)

7:34 AM  
Blogger jmf said...

Carry Trade Boosts Aluminium WSJ

Aluminum costs just over $2,000 per metric ton, based on London Metal Exchange three-month futures, up 13% from this time last year

With demand down, LME inventories of the metal have jumped to about 7 weeks worth of consumption, a level last seen in the mid-1990s according to Deutsche Bank. Supply-and-demand fundamentals don't get much worse than that. Even China doesn't help aluminum's bull case: The country has expanded smelting capacity by 25% a year over the past decade.

So why is aluminum holding up so well? The first clue is to be found in the currency markets. Spot aluminum has risen 21% in dollar terms this year, but just 13% in euro terms.

Dollar depreciation has been a factor pushing up the prices of many commodities this year. Another factor, driven similarly by loose monetary policy, is the carry trade.

In crude terms, a bank borrowing at Libor could buy a metric ton of aluminum for $1,994, fund it 80% with debt, and sell three-month futures at $2,028. Factor in storage costs of 25 cents per metric ton per day, and the implied return is 1.9%. That doesn't sound much, but the trade is virtually risk-free and the three-month return from holding Treasury bills is basically zero.

For the likes of the Federal Reserve, aluminum offers a case study in what zero interest rates and quantitative easing do to asset prices. The inflationary implications ought also to worry central bankers. Conversely, should policy makers unexpectedly decide to act on those worries, and raise rates, the carry trade underpinning many commodities, could unwind very quickly.

10:31 PM  
Blogger jmf said...

ECHO BUBBLE......

Wall Street Reopens Its Checkbook
November's flurry of financings is the latest sign that credit markets are in recovery mode after being paralyzed for much of the past year. Nearly $30 billion in loans were announced this month to fund acquisitions or leveraged buyouts, according to data provider Dealogic. The total is higher than during the seven previous months combined.

Eight of the biggest announced financing deals were for heavily leveraged companies, signaling a higher risk appetite at banks still slogging their way through old loans that went bad when the real-estate bubble burst and recession hit.

10:54 PM  
Blogger jmf said...

David R. Kotok Ritholtz

The Dubai World debt crisis has contagion risk. Insolvency cannot be permanently papered over by excess liquidity, not in the Middle East nor, for that matter, in America

1:15 AM  
Blogger francois-guillaume said...

what do you do for a living jmf

6:54 AM  
Anonymous Stephen said...

Well I guess the recession is still not over yet. I think more problem will start to surface

11:55 AM  
Anonymous Debt Cancellation Taxes said...

Shouldn't we have seen this Dubai thing coming? I mean first the real estate bubble bursts in the US and then Europe starts to fall apart. This stuff really isn't rocket science.

5:35 PM  

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